Exactly one year ago my husband (then significant other) created a post about beginning the preparation and training for a November half marathon.  This was part of our New Year’s Resolution to be healthier. Well, you know about resolutions.

But this story has a different ending.

On Facebook he said:  “I’ll never be a “runner”, but I will make the half marathon in November if it’s the last thing I do. If I can maintain the 11 minute mile from today that will get us a finish of approximately 2 hours and 40 minutes give or take. The goal is to break 3 hours.”

A public statement. A gauntlet thrown down.

Fast forward to January 20, 2020, he posted:  “I’m happy to say that since this post one year ago, I have run 3 half marathons and a 20K. My best time for a half was 2 hours 11 minutes. New life and it is all amazing.”

Mic drop.

One. Year. 

This personal evolution came with commitment, persistence and some serious stamina.  I watched in fascination and pride (and honestly, trepidation as I too was supposed to be “training” for that November half!) at his growth.  Each race, cementing his new identity.  Each race, an honoring of his transformation, the changed habits, the discipline, the accountability.

This was particularly significant for someone who HATED exercise and though structured in so many areas of life, not in working out. The limiting definition of self, “I hate exercise” needed to shift before real behavior change could happen.

I believe he found this shift in a new tribe, a running group—he saw himself fitting in there. Saw others of all ages, shapes and sizes committed to their goals. Inspiration. Motivation. Accountability.

My beloved who hated exercise and hated to be cold was getting up early Saturday mornings in the dark and in the cold to RUN.

And as we come home today, from a very brisk run, I marvel at the difference one year can make.  With focus.  With intention.

Because it’s more than becoming a “runner.”  It’s about evolution.  Transformation.  Becoming an even better version of ourselves.  It takes courage.  First run on the treadmill. Public goal. The examination of mindset. The shift in behaviors. The discipline.

As you consider your life and goals—who do you want to be? How do you want to be living your life?

Consider the following:

  1. If you could change one thing in your personal life that would help you to live your best life, what would it be?
  2. Why aren’t you doing it? (List ALL the reasons…don’t hold back!)
  3. How will you overcome each obstacle? Write it down.
  4. Who can help? Where is your tribe?
  5. Create your plan.

One thing. January 20, 2021.  Who will you be?